Dental Care at Goulburn Vet Clinic

'Doggy breath' isn't healthy. If your dog or cat has bad breath, it's a sign that there is plaque - a build-up of bacteria on the surface of the teeth. If plaque isn't removed daily it builds up in layers. When these layers harden they are called calculus, or tartar. Gingivitis, periodontal disease, and loose teeth all follow. 

If you suspect your pet has dental disease, you can book them on for a free check by one of our nurses. At this visit they can give you tips and recommend products for good home care. If there is disease, then they'll be able to book your pet in for a dental treatment.  

If your pet has dental disease picked up at a dental check, they'll need it treated. At Goulburn Vet Clinic our dental treatments have two parts. The first will be familiar to you - it is the “SPA”, or scale, polish, and assessment - the same thing that you have done with your dentist. The vet will examine the mouth and take x-rays to determine the extent of the dental disease. Our nurses will then clean the teeth and get them smelling nice and fresh.

Extracting teeth, cleaning below the gum line, and adding bone grafts can be performed to treat periodontal disease. Once diagnosed, the vet can discuss the treatment plan with you including all costs. Treatment can be performed on the same day, or can be scheduled for a time that suits. All of this ensures your pet's mouth is as healthy and pain-free as possible.

 
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 A fractured ‘carnassial’ tooth with the sensitive pulp exposed. This painful tooth was extracted, but a root canal could also have been used to treat the tooth.

A fractured ‘carnassial’ tooth with the sensitive pulp exposed. This painful tooth was extracted, but a root canal could also have been used to treat the tooth.


Anaesthesia and dentistry

One of the big differences between human and pet dentistry is the need for anaesthesia. 

As in everything we do, your pet's safety is our main priority - anaesthesia allows us to perform dental treatments in a safe and fear-free way. During all of our treatments, patients have constant monitoring, a protected airway, and warming systems so they wake up safely and quickly. 

Without anaesthesia, it is impossible to properly treat dental disease. If you are considering having your pet's teeth treated by somebody who isn't a veterinarian, please get in touch so we can answer any of your questions about the procedure. 

You can find out more by reading the Australian Veterinary Association policy.